Silverlight for S60 5th edition is available along with a Bing App

 

Silverlight for smartphone

 

Silverlight, the cross-browser, cross-platform implementation of the .NET Framework for building media experiences and rich interactive applications for the Web on desktop computers, is available for Nokia S60 5th Edition smartphones such as Nokia 5800 XpressMusic, Nokia N97 and Nokia N97 Mini.

The release of Silverlight comes the Bing Application.
The owners for s60 smart phones will be able to view Silverlight content right from your Nokia S60 browser, which is a big plus. Other than that and the new Bing application, currently I don’t see other uses for Silverlight on my Nokia N97, but this might be just for now.

Get Silverlight for S60 5th edition here!
Get the Bing Application for S60 5th edition here!

Silverlight for s60 smartphone

 

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Install Python from Source on Linux


This article is helpful for you to install Python from source on Linux system. Follow the steps as describes below:

localhost:~$ su −

Password: [enter your root password]

localhost:~# wget http://www.python.org/ftp/python/2.3/Python−2.3.tgz

Resolving www.python.org… done.

Connecting to www.python.org[194.109.137.226]:80… connected.

HTTP request sent, awaiting response… 200 OK

Length: 8,436,880 [application/x−tar]


localhost:~# tar xfz Python−2.3.tgz

localhost:~# cd Python−2.3

localhost:~#/Python−2.3# ./configure

checking MACHDEP… linux2

checking EXTRAPLATDIR…

checking for −−without−gcc… no


localhost:~#/Python−2.3# make

gcc −pthread −c −fno−strict−aliasing −DNDEBUG −g −O3 −Wall −Wstrict−prototypes

−I. −I./Include −DPy_BUILD_CORE −o Modules/python.o Modules/python.c

gcc −pthread −c −fno−strict−aliasing −DNDEBUG −g −O3 −Wall −Wstrict−prototypes

−I. −I./Include −DPy_BUILD_CORE −o Parser/acceler.o Parser/acceler.c

gcc −pthread −c −fno−strict−aliasing −DNDEBUG −g −O3 −Wall −Wstrict−prototypes

−I. −I./Include −DPy_BUILD_CORE −o Parser/grammar1.o Parser/grammar1.c


localhost:~/Python−2.3# make install /usr/bin/install −c python /usr/local/bin/python2.3


localhost:~/Python−2.3# exit

# logout

localhost:~$ which python

/usr/local/bin/python

localhost:~$ python

Python 2.3.1 (#2, Sep 24 2003, 11:39:14)

[GCC 3.3.2 20030908 (Debian prerelease)] on linux2

Type “help”, “copyright”, “credits” or “license” for more information

 

>>> [press Ctrl+D to get back to the command prompt]

 

localhost:~$

 

 

Note: All images, logos and trademarks shown on this site are property of their respective organizations

LibreOffice Rolls Out the Updates, Latest 3.3.2


LibreOffice developers releasing updates with rapid pace, since the inaugural release two months ago, LibreOffice has seen two minor version updates as well as associated developmental releases, just a couple of days ago.

LibreOffice 3.3, the fork of OpenOffice.org 3.x, was released on January 25 to a jubilant reception. It built upon the years of work that made OpenOffice.org an excellent office suite. Many OpenOffice.org developers defected when Oracle’s strategy became suspect. With the many same talented developers and supporting companies now backing LibreOffice, it is well positioned to challenge OpenOffice.org in Linux distributions and user desktops. It already pulls ahead in some polls and has replaced OOo in several popular distributions.

Version 3.3 brought nice improvements over OpenOffice.org, one of which is Scalable Vector Graphics support. Another is the long awaited support for MS Works formats and improved Word Perfect support. One of the most interesting new features is the Experimental Mode, which allows one to test upcoming features.

LibreOffice 3.3.2 was released in March 22. This release was primarily a stabilizing update bringing further bug fixes and code clean-ups. The announcement also said this release sets the stage for the next major release, 3.4.0, expected May 2.

Version 3.3.1 was released on February 23 and brought some bug fixes, new icons, and extra language additions.

Some of the more interesting changes include dictionary updates, fixed incorrect cursor navigation, fixed the occasional blank first slide in Presentation, fixed Writer losing ticks in check boxes, fixed erratic paint rendering in Impress, and added a workaround for IM problems with KDE4 integration.

The next release of LibreOffice should arrive with the developmental snapshots leading up to 3.4.0. The first beta is expected to appear any day now and release candidates will start appearing after April 4. 3.4.1 is due May 23.

Download LibreOffice 3.3.2

Features

  • It’s free
  • It’s secure and stable
  • Easy to use with powerful interface
  • Multilingual support
  • Distributed under LGPL, you can use, customize, hack, copy and distribute
  • Free developer support, Open source community driven project
  • Support major file formats that includes to import and save as MS Word, MS Excel, MS Power Point
  • LibreOffice suite includes Writer (word processor), Calc (work book/ work sheets), Impress (for multimedia presentations), Draw (to build diagrams and sketches), Base (database front end of LibreOffice), Math (simple equation editor)
  • Enhance functionality with LibreOffice Extensions
  • Automate your productivity with LibreOffice Templates

Supported Operating System

  • Microsoft Windows
  • Linux
  • Mac OS X

Pictures










First Look: Nokia Astound Smartphone

Nokia Astound Smartphone

Mobile handset maker Nokia Corp. launched smartphone Nokia Astound, available exclusively from T-Mobile USA, the unit of Germany’s Deutsche Telekom AG (DTEGY.PK: News ), since April 6. The Astound has a sleek stainless-steel design that features an 8-megapixel camera with dual-LED flash and 720p HD video capture, a 3.5-inch capacitive touch AMOLED display, free turn-by-turn navigation from Nokia and access to thousands of free and paid apps via Nokia’s Ovi Store.

With the latest commercial version of Ovi Maps, the Astound provides free voice-guided, turn-by-turn navigation in almost 100 countries in 46 languages. Additional countries and languages are available to download free from Nokia.

Mark Slater, vice president of sales, Nokia, stated, “As millions more consumers make the switch to smartphones, Nokia is proud to offer an alternative that is not only easy and fun to use, but is also very sexy and sleek, unlike anything in its price point.”

The phone itself is quite attractive with a white and silver color scheme and slim profile. While the Astound might be attractive on the outside, Symbian is still, well, Symbian. Although it is a powerful and full-featured platform, its whole aesthetic feels dated and static compared to Android 2.3, Apple’s iOS, and even the latest version of RIM’s BlackBerry OS. Thankfully, this is the most recent version of Symbian S^3 so you get a portrait QWERTY keyboard and a browser improved from the previous versions.

Nokia officials had no comment on its relationship with Microsoft, but they did hint that there will be more Symbian phones to come. The Astound is available online as well as at T-Mobile stores.

Nokia unveils 2 smartphones, Symbian refresh


Nokia, the world’s largest phone maker by volume, unveiled on Tuesday two new smartphone models running on a new version of its Symbian software platform. The new models, the E6 and the X7, will go on sale for 340 euros ($491.6) and 380 euros respectively excluding subsidies and taxes, later this quarter. In February, Nokia’s new chief executive Stephen Elop dumped Symbian software — which lost most of its lead on the smartphone market last year — saying the company would instead use Microsoft Corp’s unproven software as its primary platform.

Elop compared Symbian to a burning platform in a widely leaked internal memo, saying it was not good enough for Nokia’s future. On Tuesday Nokia unveiled a new version of Symbian software, with new icons, improved text input, faster Internet browsing and a refreshed Ovi Maps application.

“Several Nokia executives have attempted to walk back from Elop’s February comments and limit the damage he did to Symbian products,” said Tero Kuittinen, analyst at MKM Partners.

“It’s just a bit too late to put Humpty Dumpty back together. Developers are bailing out in droves,” he said.

 

Source: Reuters

The GNOME Desktop Project Unleashes GNOME 3.0


After five years of planning and design, GNOME 3.0 has been officially released. The totally rewritten desktop has had its share of both praise and condemnation in recent months due to what the project describes as “its most significant redesign of the computer experience in nine years.” They further say, the “revolutionary new user interface and new features for developers make this a historic moment for the free and open source desktop.”

The main idea in the redesign was to allow “users to focus on tasks while minimizing distractions such as notifications, extra workspaces, and background windows. Jon McCann is quoted as saying, “we’ve taken a pretty different approach in the GNOME 3 design that focuses on the desired experience and lets the interface design follow from that. With any luck you will feel more focused, aware, effective, capable, respected, delighted, and at ease.” GNOME 3.0 aims to “help us cope with modern life in a busy world. Help us connect, stay on track, feel at ease and in control.” In summary, GNOME 3.0 helps users stay “informed without being disrupted.”

Matt Zimmerman, Ubuntu CTO, said, “In the face of constant change, both in software technology itself and in people’s attitudes toward it, long-term software projects need to reinvent themselves in order to stay relevant. I’m encouraged to see the GNOME community taking up this challenge, responding to the evolving needs of users and questioning the status quo.”

GNOME founder, Miguel de Icaza adds, “GNOME continues to innovate in the desktop space. The new GNOME Shell is an entire new user experience that was designed from the ground up to improve the usability of the desktop and giving both designers and developers a quick way to improve the desktop and adapt the user interface to new needs. By tightly integrating Javascript with the GNOME platform, designers were able to create and quickly iterate on creating an interface that is both pleasant and exciting to use. I could not be happier with the results.”

Some of the new features include:

  • Activities Overview at a Glance
  • Built-in Messaging
  • Redesigned System Settings
  • Side-by-side window tiling
  • Redesigned file manager
  • Faster performance
  • Beautiful interface

The official press release:

Groton, MA, April 6 2011: Today, the GNOME Desktop project released GNOME 3.0, its most significant redesign of the computer experience in nine years. A revolutionary new user interface and new features for developers make this a historic moment for the free and open source desktop.

Within GNOME 3, GNOME Shell reimagines the user interface for the next generation of the desktop. This innovative interface allows users to focus on tasks while minimizing distractions such as notifications, extra workspaces, and background windows.

Jon McCann, one of GNOME Shell’s designers, says of the design team, “we’ve taken a pretty different approach in the GNOME 3 design that focuses on the desired experience and lets the interface design follow from that.” The result: “With any luck you will feel more focused, aware, effective, capable, respected, delighted, and at ease.” GNOME Shell aims to “help us cope with modern life in a busy world. Help us connect, stay on track, feel at ease and in control.” GNOME Shell, he says, will keep users “informed without being disrupted.”

The GNOME 3 development platform includes improvements in the display backend, a new API, improvements in search, user messaging, system settings, and streamlined libraries. GNOME 2 applications will continue to work in the GNOME 3 environment without modification, allowing developers to move to the GNOME 3 environment at their own pace. The GNOME 3 release notes include further details.

Matt Zimmerman, Ubuntu CTO at Canonical, praises GNOME 3: “In the face of constant change, both in software technology itself and in people’s attitudes toward it, long-term software projects need to reinvent themselves in order to stay relevant. I’m encouraged to see the GNOME community taking up this challenge, responding to the evolving needs of users and questioning the status quo.”

Miguel de Icaza, one of GNOME’s founders, celebrates the new release: “GNOME continues to innovate in the desktop space. The new GNOME Shell is an entire new user experience that was designed from the ground up to improve the usability of the desktop and giving both designers and developers a quick way to improve the desktop and adapt the user interface to new needs. By tightly integrating Javascript with the GNOME platform, designers were able to create and quickly iterate on creating an interface that is both pleasant and exciting to use. I could not be happier with the results.”

GNOME 3 is the cumulative work of five years of planning and design by the GNOME community. McCann notes: “Perhaps the most notable part of the design process is that everything has been done in the open. We’ve had full transparency for every decision (good and bad) and every change we’ve made. We strongly believe in this model. It is not only right in principle — it is just the best way in the long run to build great software sustainably in a large community.”

In partnership with Novell, Red Hat, other distributors, schools and governments, and user groups, GNOME 3 will reach millions of users around the world. Over 3500 people have contributed changes to the project’s code repositories, including the employees of 106 companies. GNOME 3 includes innumerable code changes since the 2.0 release 9 years ago.

Users and fans of GNOME have planned more than a hundred launch parties around the world. Users can download GNOME 3 from http://gnome3.org to try it immediately, or wait for distributions to carry it over the coming months. GNOME 3 continues to push new frontiers in user interaction.

—–

The GNOME Project was started in 1997 by two then-university students, Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero. Their aim: to produce a free (as in freedom) desktop environment. Since then, GNOME has grown into a hugely successful enterprise. Used by millions of people across the world, it is the most popular desktop environment for GNU/Linux and UNIX-type operating systems. The desktop has been utilised in successful, large-scale enterprise and public deployments, and the project’s developer technologies are utilised in a large number of popular mobile devices. For further comments and information, contact the GNOME press contact team atgnome-press-contact@gnome.org.

 

 

Credits: Susan Linton, Linux Journal

Wi-Fi on the Command Line

More people than ever are using wireless networks as their primary networking medium. Great programs are available under X11 that give users a graphical interface to their wireless cards. Both GNOME and KDE include network management utilities, and a desktop-environment-agnostic utility called wicd also offers great functionality. But, what if you aren’t running X11 and want to manage your wireless card? I don’t cover how to install and activate your card here (for that, take a look at projects like madwifi or ndiswrapper). I assume your card is installed and configured properly, and that it is called wlan0. Most of the utilities mentioned below need to talk directly to your wireless card (or at least the card driver), so they need to be run with root privileges (just remember to use sudo). The first step is to see what wireless networks are available in your area. A utility called iwlist provides all sorts of information about your wireless environment. To scan your environment for available networks, do the following:

sudo iwlist wlan0 scan

You’ll see output resembling:

Cell 01 – Address: 00:11:22:33:44:55

ESSID:”network-essid”

Mode:Master

Channel:11

Frequency:2.462 GHz (Channel 11)

Quality=100/100 Signal level:-47dBm Noise level=-100dBm

Encryption key:off

The details (address and essid) have been changed to protect the guilty. Also, the … represents extra output that may or may not be available, depending on your hardware. You will get a separate cell entry for each access point within your wireless card’s range. For each access point, you can find the hardware address, the essid and the channel on which it’s operating. Also, you can learn in what mode the access point is operating (whether master or ad hoc). Usually, you will be most interested in the essid and what encryption is being used. Once you know what’s available in your immediate environment, configure your wireless card to use one of these access points using the iwconfig utility to set the parameters for your wireless card. First, set the essid, which identifies the network access point you want:

sudo iwconfig wlan0 essid network-essid

Depending on your card and its driver, you may have the option to set the essid to the special value “any”. In this case, your card will pick the first available access point. This is called promiscuous mode. You also may need to set the mode to be used by your wireless card. This depends on your network topology. You may have a central access point to which all of the other devices connect, or you may have an ad hoc wireless network, where all of the devices communicate as peers. You may want to have your computer act as an access point. If so, you can set the mode to master using iwconfig. Or, you simply may want to sniff what’s happening around you. You can do so by setting the mode to monitor and passively monitor all packets on the frequency to which your card is set. You can set the frequency, or channel, by running:

sudo iwconfig wlan0 freq 2.422G

Or by running:

sudo iwconfig wlan0 channel 3

You can set other parameters, but you should consider doing so only if you have a really good reason. One option is the sensitivity threshold, which defines how sensitive the card is to noise and signal strength, and you can set the behavior of the retry mechanism for the wireless card. You may need to play with this in very noisy environments. Set the maximum number of retries with:

sudo iwconfig wlan0 retry 16

Or, set the maximum lifetime to keep retrying to 300 milliseconds with:

sudo iwconfig wlan0 retry lifetime 300m

In a very noisy environment, you also may need to play with packet fragmentation. If entire packets can’t make it from point to point without corruption, your wireless card may have to break down packets into smaller chunks to avoid this. You can tell the card what to use as a maximum fragment size with:

sudo iwconfig wlan0 frag 512

This value can be anything less than the size of a packet. Some cards may not apply these settings changes immediately. In that case, run this command to flush all pending changes to the card and apply them:

sudo iwconfig wlan0 commit

Two other useful commands are iwspy and iwpriv. If your card supports it, you can collect wireless statistics by using:

sudo iwspy wlan0

The second command gives you access to optional parameters for your particular card. iwconfig is used for the generic options available. If you run it without any parameters (sudo iwpriv wlan0), it lists all available options for the card. If no extra options exist, you will see output like this:

wlan0 no private ioctls

To set one of these private options, run:

sudo iwpriv wlan0 private-command [private parameters]

Now that your card is configured and connected to the wireless network, you need to configure your networking options to use it. If you are using DHCP on the network, you simply can run dhclient to query the DHCP server and get your IP address and other network settings. If you want to set these options manually, use the ifconfig command (see the man page for more information).

Tips:

  • You can also change the MAC address with ifconfig if need be.

    $ ifconfig wlan0 down

    $ ifconfig wlan0 hw ether 00:11:22:33:44:55

    $ ifconfig wlan0 up

    OR

    Use macchanger

  • You will probably want to look into wpa_supplicant for all your WPA etc needs (I typed in the status command):

    —————–8<—————–
    # wpa_cli
    wpa_cli v0.7.3
    Copyright (c) 2004-2010, Jouni Malinen and contributors
    …..
    Selected interface ‘wlan0′

    Interactive mode

    > status
    bssid=00:50:7f:95:c1:e0
    ssid=
    id=0
    mode=station
    pairwise_cipher=CCMP
    group_cipher=CCMP
    key_mgmt=WPA2-PSK
    wpa_state=COMPLETED
    ip_address=
    >
    —————–8<—————–

    On Gentoo, make sure driver is compiled in, emerge wpa_supplicant, add this (or similar) to /etc/conf.d/net:

    wpa_supplicant_wlan0=”-Dwext”
    config_wlan0=”dhcp”

    Then add a stanza like the following to /etc/wpa_supplicant/wpa_supplicant.conf:

    network={
    ssid=”My_SSID”
    psk=”My_WPA(2)_shared_key”
    }

    Add net.wlan0 to default runlevel, start it and forget about it!

    I’m sure that shouldn’t be too hard to replicate on another Linux distro.

    Finally, check the output from:

    #ip a
    #ip r
    (#ifconfig and netstat -r for the old school)
    #dmesg
    #less /var/log/messages (or syslog)

    Of course wpa_cli (type help for some command to use)

Note:

  • You cannot use “iwlist ra0 scan” while your interface is in monitor mode. Try this:

    ifconfig ra0 down

    iwconfig ra0 mode managed

    ifconfig ra0 up

    iwlist ra0 scan

  • You can use wireshark to monitor your outcomming packets and see that none of them is bigger than that


Credits: Joey Bernard, Linux Journal

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