Scholarships at Yokohama National University

Yokohama National University has for many years been instrumental in providing university graduates with opportunities to further their post-graduate work.

The University’s special emphasis on the promotion of international exchanges with overseas universities has been stimulated by the role of Yokohama, a major port and the second largest city in Japan, as a point of contact with other countries. Yokohama is the vibrant heart of a civilization which has received direct influence from the West and then integrated these influences into the development of present-day Japan.

The City of Yokohama has a well-developed infrastructure network. Because of its central location, Yokohama has had excellent access to theoretical and practical information available through various international agencies of the government, and Yokohama National University has been closely involved in issues of infrastructure management. Much of this experience and knowledge is applicable to the infrastructure development needs of developing countries.

The Infrastructure Management Program is formally administered by the International Graduate School of Social Sciences’ International and Business Law Department, but it is in fact jointly planned and conducted by all of YNU’s graduate schools. In working toward a Master’s Degree through the Infrastructure Management Program, students will study in areas associated with the International Graduate School of Social Sciences, the graduate schools of Education, Engineering, and Environmental and Information Sciences as well as the International Student Center.

In applying for admission to the program, applicants should note the following:

1. The Master’s Program in Infrastructure Management is oriented to training government officials with present or future management responsibility and an academic background in the field of engineering.?Women are encouraged to apply. Applicants must:

(a) have completed undergraduate work in engineering or an equivalent field of study;

(b) be 35 years of age or under as of April 1, 2011;

(c) have at least 4 years of practical experience involving responsibility for infrastructure development; and

(d) be in good health (semifinalists will be required to submit a health certificate signed by their doctor.)

2. Because the entire program is carried out in English, applicants must provide evidence of a satisfactory level of English competence, either by enclosing the result of the official TOEFL/IELTS (or an equivalent English proficiency examination) or by proving that they have completed a university program conducted mainly in English. TOEFL institution code for Yokohama National University is 0410 and department code for Infrastructure Management Program is 88 (International Relations).

3. Letters of reference or recommendation from two different people must be provided to support the application. One of these must be from a person who has supervised the applicant in a work situation and the other from a professor at the university from which the applicant graduated.

4. It is preferred that successful candidates arrange for a leave of absence from their employer for the two-year period during which they are to participate in the program. This leave should assure their re-employment after completion of the program.

Application and Entry Requirements (PDF file)
Application Procedure (PDF file)
Application Form (PDF file)
Check List (PDF file)
Recommendation Letter (PDF file)

Contact detail: jwbimp14@ynu.ac.jp
Moreinfo: http://www.igss.ynu.ac.jp/imp/ynu_r/howtoapply/howtoapply.htm
Scholarships at Yokohama National University

World Information Society Day

World Information Society Day
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
World Information Society Day was proclaimed to be on 17 May by a United Nations General Assembly resolution, following the 2005 World Summit on the Information Society in Tunis.[1]
The day had previously been known as World Telecommunication Day to commemorate the founding of the International Telecommunication Union in 17 May 1865.[2] It was instituted by the Plenipotentiary Conference in Malaga-Torremolinos in 1973.
The main objective of the day is to raise global awareness of societal changes brought about by the Internet and new technologies. It also aims to help reduce the Digital divide.
Contents [hide]
1 World Information Society Day
2 World Telecommunication and Information Society Day
3 References
4 See also
5 External links
[edit]World Information Society Day

In November 2005, the World Summit on the Information Society called upon the UN General Assembly to declare 17 May as World Information Society Day to focus on the importance of ICT and the wide range of issues related to the Information Society raised by WSIS. The General Assembly adopted a resolution (A/RES/60/252) in March 2006 stipulating that World Information Society Day shall be celebrated every year on 17 May. The first World Information Society Day took place on Wednesday, 17 May 2006.[3]
[edit]World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

In November 2006, the ITU Plenipotentiary Conference in Antalya, Turkey, decided to celebrate both events on 17 May as World Telecommunication and Information Society Day. The updated Resolution 68 invites Member States and Sector Members to celebrate the day annually by organizing appropriate national programmes with a view to:
stimulating reflection and exchanges of ideas on the theme adopted by the Council
debating the various aspects of the theme with all partners in society
formulating a report reflecting national discussions on the issues underlying the theme, to be fed back to ITU and the rest of its membership
[edit]References

^ United Nations General Assembly Resolution 252 session 60 page 3 on 27 March 2006 (retrieved 2007-09-12)
^ “World Telecommunication Day 2006: Promoting Global Cybersecurity”. 28 March 2006.
^ “In message for world information society day, Secretary-General calls for International countermeasure to enhance cybersecurity”. 26 April 2006.
World Information Society Day – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

System Administrator Appreciation Day

ystem Administrator Appreciation Day, also known as Sysadmin Day, SysAdminDay or SAAD, was created by system administrator Ted Kekatos. Kekatos was inspired to create the special day by a Hewlett-Packard magazine advertisement in which a system administrator is presented with flowers and fruit-baskets by grateful co-workers as thanks for installing new printers.
The holiday exists to show appreciation for the work of sysadmins and other IT workers. It is celebrated on the last Friday in July. The first System Administrator Appreciation Day was celebrated on July 28, 2000. The next holiday is Friday, July 29, 2011.
Many geek and Internet culture businesses, such as ThinkGeek and CafePress, also honor the holiday with special product offerings and contests. Various filk songs have been written to commemorate the day.[1][2] However, attempts to have Hallmark and E-card firms “publish greeting cards for the occasion have been fruitless.”[3] The day has been recognized and promoted by two professional organizations, the League of Professional System Administrators and SAGE/USENIX.[4]
[edit]References

^ The System Administrator Day Song (video and mp3)
^ UKUUG System Administrator Day Song (video and mp3)
^ Hoyt, Elizabeth (July 27, 2001). “System Administrator Appreciation Day”.
^ MacVittie, Lori (July 28, 2006 10:41 AM). “Happy Sysadmin Day!”. Network Computing blogs.
[edit]See also

World Information Society Day
Programmers’ Day

System Administrator Appreciation Day – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

System Administrator Appreciation Day

System Administrator Appreciation Day, also known as Sysadmin Day, SysAdminDay or SAAD, was created by system administrator Ted Kekatos. Kekatos was inspired to create the special day by a Hewlett-Packard magazine advertisement in which a system administrator is presented with flowers and fruit-baskets by grateful co-workers as thanks for installing new printers.\r\nThe holiday exists to show appreciation for the work of sysadmins and other IT workers. It is celebrated on the last Friday in July. The first System Administrator Appreciation Day was celebrated on July 28, 2000. The next holiday is Friday, July 29, 2011.\r\nMany geek and Internet culture businesses, such as ThinkGeek and CafePress, also honor the holiday with special product offerings and contests. Various filk songs have been written to commemorate the day. However, attempts to have Hallmark and E-card firms “publish greeting cards for the occasion have been fruitless.” The day has been recognized and promoted by two professional organizations, the League of Professional System Administrators and SAGE/USENIX.

System Administrator Appreciation Day

System Administrator Appreciation Day

Advice to employees on the proper use of the System Administrator’s valuable time

(In following examples, we will substitute the name “Ted” as the System Administrator)

Make sure to save all your MP3 files on your network drive. No sense in wasting valuable space on your local drive! Plus, Ted loves browsing through 100+ GB of music files while he backs up the servers.
Play with all the wires you can find. If you can’t find enough, open something up to expose them. After you have finished, and nothing works anymore, put it all back together and call Ted. Deny that you touched anything and that it was working perfectly only five minutes ago. Ted just loves a good mystery. For added effect you can keep looking over his shoulder and ask what each wire is for.
Never write down error messages. Just click OK, or restart your computer. Ted likes to guess what the error message was.
When talking about your computer, use terms like “Thingy” and “Big Connector.”
If you get an EXE file in an email attachment, open it immediately. Ted likes to make sure the anti-virus software is working properly.
When Ted says he coming right over, log out and go for coffee. It’s no problem for him to remember your password.
When you call Ted to have your computer moved, be sure to leave it buried under a year-old pile of postcards, baby pictures, stuffed animals, dried flowers, unpaid bills, bowling trophies and Popsicle sticks. Ted doesn’t have a life, and he finds it deeply moving to catch a glimpse of yours.
When Ted sends you an email marked as “Highly Important” or “Action Required”, delete it at once. He’s probably just testing some new-fangled email software.
When Ted’s eating lunch at his desk or in the lunchroom, walk right in, grab a few of his fries, then spill your guts and expect him to respond immediately. Ted lives to serve, and he’s always ready to think about fixing computers, especially yours.
When Ted’s at the water cooler or outside taking a breath of fresh air, find him and ask him a computer question. The only reason he takes breaks at all is to ferret out all those employees who don’t have email or a telephone.
Send urgent email ALL IN UPPERCASE. The mail server picks it up and flags it as a rush delivery.
When the photocopier doesn’t work, call Ted. There’s electronics in it, so it should be right up his alley.
When you’re getting a NO DIAL TONE message at your home computer, call Ted. He enjoys fixing telephone problems from remote locations. Especially on weekends.
When something goes wrong with your home PC, dump it on Ted’s chair the next morning with no name, no phone number, and no description of the problem. Ted just loves a good mystery.
When you have Ted on the phone walking you through changing a setting on your PC, read the newspaper. Ted doesn’t actually mean for you to DO anything. He just loves to hear himself talk.
When your company offers training on an upcoming OS upgrade, don’t bother to sign up. Ted will be there to hold your hand when the time comes.
When the printer won’t print, re-send the job 20 times in rapid succession. That should do the trick.
When the printer still won’t print after 20 tries, send the job to all the printers in the office. One of them is bound to work.
Don’t use online help. Online help is for wimps.
Don’t read the operator’s manual. Manuals are for wussies.
If you’re taking night classes in computer science, feel free to demonstrate your fledgling expertise by updating the network drivers for you and all your co-workers. Ted will be grateful for the overtime when he has to stay until 2:30am fixing all of them.
When Ted’s fixing your computer at a quarter past one, eat your Whopper with cheese in his face. He functions better when he’s slightly dizzy from hunger.
When Ted asks you whether you’ve installed any new software on your computer, LIE. It’s no one else’s business what you’ve got on your computer.
If the mouse cable keeps knocking down the framed picture of your dog, lift the monitor and stuff the cable under it. Those skinny Mouse cables were designed to have 55 lbs. of computer monitor crushing them.
If the space bar on your keyboard doesn’t work, blame Ted for not upgrading it sooner. Hell, it’s not your fault there’s a half pound of pizza crust crumbs, nail clippings, and big sticky drops of Mountain Dew under the keys.
When you get the message saying “Are you sure?”, click the “Yes” button as fast as you can. Hell, if you weren’t sure, you wouldn’t be doing it, would you?
Feel perfectly free to say things like “I don’t know nothing about that boneheaded computer crap.” It never bothers Ted to hear his area of professional expertise referred to as boneheaded crap.
Don’t even think of breaking large print jobs down into smaller chunks. God forbid somebody else should sneak a one-page job in between your 500-page Word document.
When you send that 500-page document to the printer, don’t bother to check if the printer has enough paper. That’s Ted’s job.
When Ted calls you 30 minutes later and tells you that the printer printed 24 pages of your 500-page document before it ran out of paper, and there are now nine other jobs in the queue behind yours, ask him why he didn’t bother to add more paper.
When you receive a 130 MB movie file, send it to everyone as a high-priority mail attachment. Ted’s provided plenty of disk space and processor capacity on the new mail server for just those kinds of important things.
When you bump into Ted in the grocery store on a Sunday afternoon, ask him computer questions. He works 24/7, and is always thinking about computers, even when he’s at super-market buying toilet paper and doggie treats.
If your son is a student in computer science, have him come in on the weekends and do his projects on your office computer. Ted will be there for you when your son’s illegal copy of Visual Basic 6.0 makes the Access database keel over and die.
When you bring Ted your own “no-name” brand PC to repair for free at the office, tell him how urgently he needs to fix it so you can get back to playing EverQuest. He’ll get on it right away, because everyone knows he doesn’t do anything all day except surf the Internet.
Don’t ever thank Ted. He loves fixing everything AND getting paid for it!

Advice to employees on the proper use of the System Administrator’s valuable time

In following examples, we will substitute the name “Ted” as the System Administrator\r\n

    \r\n
  • Make sure to save all your MP3 files on your network drive. No sense in wasting valuable space on your local drive! Plus, Ted loves browsing through 100+ GB of music files while he backs up the servers.
  • \r\n

  • Play with all the wires you can find. If you can’t find enough, open something up to expose them. After you have finished, and nothing works anymore, put it all back together and call Ted. Deny that you touched anything and that it was working perfectly only five minutes ago. Ted just loves a good mystery. For added effect you can keep looking over his shoulder and ask what each wire is for.
  • \r\n

  • Never write down error messages. Just click OK, or restart your computer. Ted likes to guess what the error message was.
  • \r\n

  • When talking about your computer, use terms like “Thingy” and “Big Connector.”
  • \r\n

  • If you get an EXE file in an email attachment, open it immediately. Ted likes to make sure the anti-virus software is working properly.
  • \r\n

  • When Ted says he coming right over, log out and go for coffee. It’s no problem for him to remember your password.
  • \r\n

  • When you call Ted to have your computer moved, be sure to leave it buried under a year-old pile of postcards, baby pictures, stuffed animals, dried flowers, unpaid bills, bowling trophies and Popsicle sticks. Ted doesn’t have a life, and he finds it deeply moving to catch a glimpse of yours.
  • \r\n

  • When Ted sends you an email marked as “Highly Important” or “Action Required”, delete it at once. He’s probably just testing some new-fangled email software.
  • \r\n

  • When Ted’s eating lunch at his desk or in the lunchroom, walk right in, grab a few of his fries, then spill your guts and expect him to respond immediately. Ted lives to serve, and he’s always ready to think about fixing computers, especially yours.
  • \r\n

  • When Ted’s at the water cooler or outside taking a breath of fresh air, find him and ask him a computer question. The only reason he takes breaks at all is to ferret out all those employees who don’t have email or a telephone.
  • \r\n

  • Send urgent email ALL IN UPPERCASE. The mail server picks it up and flags it as a rush delivery.
  • \r\n

  • When the photocopier doesn’t work, call Ted. There’s electronics in it, so it should be right up his alley.
  • \r\n

  • When you’re getting a NO DIAL TONE message at your home computer, call Ted. He enjoys fixing telephone problems from remote locations. Especially on weekends.
  • \r\n

  • When something goes wrong with your home PC, dump it on Ted’s chair the next morning with no name, no phone number, and no description of the problem. Ted just loves a good mystery.
  • \r\n

  • When you have Ted on the phone walking you through changing a setting on your PC, read the newspaper. Ted doesn’t actually mean for you to DO anything. He just loves to hear himself talk.
  • \r\n

  • When your company offers training on an upcoming OS upgrade, don’t bother to sign up. Ted will be there to hold your hand when the time comes.
  • \r\n

  • When the printer won’t print, re-send the job 20 times in rapid succession. That should do the trick.
  • \r\n

  • When the printer still won’t print after 20 tries, send the job to all the printers in the office. One of them is bound to work.
  • \r\n

  • Don’t use online help. Online help is for wimps.
  • \r\n

  • Don’t read the operator’s manual. Manuals are for wussies.
  • \r\n

  • If you’re taking night classes in computer science, feel free to demonstrate your fledgling expertise by updating the network drivers for you and all your co-workers. Ted will be grateful for the overtime when he has to stay until 2:30am fixing all of them.
  • \r\n

  • When Ted’s fixing your computer at a quarter past one, eat your Whopper with cheese in his face. He functions better when he’s slightly dizzy from hunger.
  • \r\n

  • When Ted asks you whether you’ve installed any new software on your computer, LIE. It’s no one else’s business what you’ve got on your computer.
  • \r\n

  • If the mouse cable keeps knocking down the framed picture of your dog, lift the monitor and stuff the cable under it. Those skinny Mouse cables were designed to have 55 lbs. of computer monitor crushing them.
  • \r\n

  • If the space bar on your keyboard doesn’t work, blame Ted for not upgrading it sooner. Hell, it’s not your fault there’s a half pound of pizza crust crumbs, nail clippings, and big sticky drops of Mountain Dew under the keys.
  • \r\n

  • When you get the message saying “Are you sure?”, click the “Yes” button as fast as you can. Hell, if you weren’t sure, you wouldn’t be doing it, would you?
  • \r\n

  • Feel perfectly free to say things like “I don’t know nothing about that boneheaded computer crap.” It never bothers Ted to hear his area of professional expertise referred to as boneheaded crap.
  • \r\n

  • Don’t even think of breaking large print jobs down into smaller chunks. God forbid somebody else should sneak a one-page job in between your 500-page Word document.
  • \r\n

  • When you send that 500-page document to the printer, don’t bother to check if the printer has enough paper. That’s Ted’s job.
  • \r\n

  • When Ted calls you 30 minutes later and tells you that the printer printed 24 pages of your 500-page document before it ran out of paper, and there are now nine other jobs in the queue behind yours, ask him why he didn’t bother to add more paper.
  • \r\n

  • When you receive a 130 MB movie file, send it to everyone as a high-priority mail attachment. Ted’s provided plenty of disk space and processor capacity on the new mail server for just those kinds of important things.
  • \r\n

  • When you bump into Ted in the grocery store on a Sunday afternoon, ask him computer questions. He works 24/7, and is always thinking about computers, even when he’s at super-market buying toilet paper and doggie treats.
  • \r\n

  • If your son is a student in computer science, have him come in on the weekends and do his projects on your office computer. Ted will be there for you when your son’s illegal copy of Visual Basic 6.0 makes the Access database keel over and die.
  • \r\n

  • When you bring Ted your own “no-name” brand PC to repair for free at the office, tell him how urgently he needs to fix it so you can get back to playing EverQuest. He’ll get on it right away, because everyone knows he doesn’t do anything all day except surf the Internet.
  • \r\n

  • Don’t ever thank Ted. He loves fixing everything AND getting paid for it!
  • \r\n

System Administrator Appreciation Day

System Administrator Appreciation Day

What Does a System Administrator Do?

What is a system administrator? Well, look at the title. Administrator of systems. A system administrator takes care of systems.

Now, most people read “system” to mean an individual computer, and think that all a sysadmin does is clean viruses off your computer and replace your monitor. That’s not wrong — but it is only one page of the whole story.

A real computing system is larger. Very few computers work just on their own anymore; when you use the web, play a game online, share files with a friend, or send email, you’re using a complex and intricate collection of computers, networks and software that come together to do the job you’re asking.

A sysadmin manages these systems — they figure out how to bring storage from one server, processing from another, backups from a third and networking from a fourth computer all together, working seamlessly. For you.

It’s not an easy task. Your sysadmins need to understand in depth computing protocols. They often have to know something about programming, something about hardware, a lot about software — and even more about the people using their system.

A sysadmin is a professional, with complex skills, ethical challenges, and a daunting job. Many, if not most, people find computers difficult to use, and sometimes they’re unreliable. Being a sysadmin doesn’t absolve someone of dealing with unreliable computers. Oh, one can dream of such a day, but the opposite is true; no one sees more dead computers in a day than a sysadmin. No one sees them doing truly baffling things, and no one has more stories of computers failing, acting possessed, or even catching on fire.

The challenge of a sysadmin is making a computing system — a whole network of resources and servers and software — work together, work right, work even when parts of it fail — and work for you.

That’s the most important job of the sysadmin: to work for you. To take the staggering array of technologies, acronyms, protocols, networks, vendors, budgets, limited time, competing products, and threats to the computing network, assemble them all together in a working system. Their job is not only to be the geek in the corner who types all day. What they’re doing is bringing these diverse pieces of technology into order, and fitting them together to fill your needs at work and home; to translate the world of computing into human terms.

This is a daunting task and we’re still at the cutting edge; we’re not perfect, and the field is still figuring itself out. Being a sysadmin takes a certain boldness, to be one of the first people to take on the challenge of turning difficult computers into easy to use systems. But hundreds of thousands of people are working in that field now, from the entry level help desk tech to the corporate CIOs and everyone in between.

So when you think of a sysadmin, think of the people who run the servers that help you clean it off, the people who run your backups to make sure your data is safe, the people who bring you the network, the people who monitor it for security — and yes, the person who cleans the virus off your computer and replaces your monitor.