Category Archives: Mobile

All about mobile phones, smart phones, hand held devices, iPhone, iPAD, Nokia, Windows Mobile, HTC, Blackberry, linux mobile, Android, PALM, HP and more…

Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660

Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660 Review

Samsung has announced its brand new mid-range Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660 Android Powered Smartphone, just in time for official unveiling of the same at forthcoming Mobile World Congress 2011, that is powered by Qualcomm QCT MSM7227-1 Turbo 800 MHz processor and runs Android 2.2 Froyo.

Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660
Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660

The Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660 smartphone is Quad-band GSM: 850, 900, 1800, 1900 dual-band 3G HSDPA: 900, 2100 ready device which is powered by 800 MHz Qualcomm QCT MSM7227-1 Turbo Processor and features 158MB RAM with microSD card supporting 32GB expandable memory allowing practically unlimited entries contact phonebook and SMS memory.

Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660 smartphone features 3.2-inch, HVGA 320 x 480 pixel TFT capacitive touchscreen supporting 16 million colors and sports two touch-sensitive keys and a large home key in same fashion as on Galaxy S series smartphones.The smartphone also includes Accelerometer sensor for auto screen rotate and runs on Android 2.2 Froyo version with Samsung’s TouchWiz v3.0 user interface over Android just like the one in Samsung Galaxy series smartphones.

The new Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660 offers exhaustive data connectivity that includes GPRS, EDGE, 3G HSDPA 7.2 Mbps download speed, Wi-Fi 802.11b/g/N Wireless LAN with DLNA, Bluetooth 2.1+EDR with A2DP wireless connection, GPS with Assisted GPS (A-GPS) and microUSB 2.0 for wired connectivity.

Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660 includes 3.15 megapixel (2048 x 1536 pixel) rear auto-focus camera ( no LED flash) with added geo-tagging, face and smile recognition capability along with video recording in QVGA resolution. The device does not sports any front-facing camera for video calling.

Source: MPhone, W3

iPad 2

The iPad 2: What is known, what is unknown Read more about next-generation iPad by ssysadmin.com

We’re just 48 hours away from getting our first look at the long-awaited, next-generation iPad—or that’s what we’re expecting, at least.

iPad 2
iPad 2

Indeed, with all the leaks, rumors, and wild guesses we’ve been hearing in the past months about the next iPad, it’s easy to forget that Apple hasn’t even officially announced the thing yet, much less doled out any details or pictures.

Since we still have a couple days to kill before Apple ends the suspense, now might a good time to summarize what we know, what we think we know, and—most importantly—what we definitely don’t know about the iPad 2.

What we know

The original iPad is still the only iPad, for now: Like I just said, Apple has yet to announce, acknowledge, make veiled references to, or even hint at a new iPad. Well … strike that: during Apple’s most recent quarterly earnings call, Apple COO Tim Cook told analysts (who’d been asking about competition from impending Android-based tablets) that “we’re not sitting still” in terms of the tablet market, a remark that may qualify as a vague hint.

Apple is holding an iPad-related event Wednesday: The invitations went out last week, with an image showing a Mac OS calendar page peeled back to reveal an iPad peeking out from behind. The caption: “Come see what 2011 will be the year of.” So yes—the writing’s on the wall, but the invite stops short of saying “come meet the iPad 2″ or anything like that.

Last but not least, we know that … uh … : If we’re only talking about things we definitely know about the next iPad … well, strictly speaking, we don’t know much more than what I just outlined above. Oh, wait: Wednesday’s Apple event will be held in San Francisco, at 10 in the morning local time. And iPad-related topics are on the agenda. There you go.

What we don’t know

What it’ll be called: Everyone’s been calling the next iPad the “iPad 2,” and there’s even a new (and likely fan-generated) rendering of the next-generation tablet floating around with the “iPad 2″ name stamped on the back. But as far as I know, no one’s come out and reported that the iPad 2 will, in fact, be called the iPad 2. Apple’s been known to throw curve balls when it comes to naming its next-gen products (like, for example, the iPhone 3G and 3GS), so I wouldn’t put all my eggs in the “iPad 2″ basket.

How much internal storage it’ll have: Will we get an iPad 2 model with 128GB of built-in flash storage, or will the largest next-gen iPad still top out at 64GB? Hard to say. There have been scattered reports of iPad 2 mockups with “128GB” etched onto the back, but that may be more a case of wishful thinking than a concrete clue. I predict the priciest iPad will still offer “just” 64GB of flash storage (which still costs a premium compared to conventional disc-based hard drives), but that’s only a guess on my part.

How much it will cost: Apple is in the habit of marking its next-generation products with the same price as the previous generation, and there’s no reason to believe that Cupertino will change course with the iPad 2. Again, though, we’ve yet to hear any reliable rumors about pricing. (For the record, the current iPad costs anywhere from $499 for the 16GB Wi-Fi-only version to $829 for the 64GB 3G iPad.)

When it will ship: Conventional wisdom initially had it that the new iPad would probably hit stores about a month or so after being announced, but now there’s talk the iPad 2 might be available immediately. Maybe so, but personally, I’m hedging my bets until Apple serves up the official line.

What we think we know

Slimmer profile, less heft: Just about everyone seems to agree that the redesigned iPad will be “smaller” and “lighter” than its predecessor, complete with a flatter back and tapered edges. Indeed, chatter about a slimmed-down iPad 2 shell has been so consistent (not to mention a logical progression for the iPad line) that I’d be shocked if it didn’t come to pass Wednesday.

A camera, or two: Another consistent iPad 2 rumor has it that Apple will fix one of the biggest criticisms of the original iPad—namely, the lack of a camera. A recent Wall Street Journal story claimed that the new iPad will have “at least” one camera in front for FaceTime video chat, and there have been countless sightings of purported iPad 2 cases with strategically placed holes in back for a second, rear-facing lens. While there still seems to be some lingering doubt about a second camera, a front-facing lens is pretty much a no-brainer, particularly since each and every iPad competitor out there has one.

Same-resolution display: The hot rumor back in December had it that the iPad 2 would arrive with a sharper, 2,048-by-1,536 pixel display, good for a “retina”-style screen similar to the one on the iPhone 4. But the latest word and some leaked spy shots have poured cold water on the buzz, and it’s now looking almost certain that the revamped iPad display will come with a 1,024-by-768-resolution display, same as the original. Oh well. (Don’t worry; recent chatter has it that the iPad 3—yes, 3—might get the retina-display treatment.)

Faster, beefier processor: “Dual-core” is the gotta-have spec when it comes to this year’s hottest smartphones and gadgets, and the iPad 2 is no exception. Most believe the revamped tablet will get an updated, dual-core version of Apple’s A4 “system-on-a-chip,” complete with 512MB of RAM (double the 256MB RAM in the original iPad) and some seriously souped-up graphics capabilities.

Better speaker: The new iPad is reportedly in line for an improved, “wide-ranged” speaker, with the more prominent speaker grille said to be sitting right where the current three-hole speaker on the first iPad lives. Or so they say.

No SD card: An SD (or microSD) card slot on the next iPad would allow for easy memory expansion and speedy photo uploading. It’s a nice idea, but early buzz on Apple adding an SD card slot to the iPad has given way to near-universal agreement that it won’t actually happen. Bummer.

No 4G support: Not on Verizon Wireless, at least, according to the Wall Street Journal, which adds that the 3G version of the iPad 2 will be available through AT&T and Verizon but not Sprint or T-Mobile.

Source: yahoonews, W3

Magic W3, Mini PC with phone capabilities

Magic W3: Mini-PC with phone capabilities

Magic W3, Mini PC with phone capabilities
Magic W3, Mini PC with phone capabilities

Recently, devices like LG’s Tegra 2-powered Optimus 2X have blurred the lines between smartphone and mini-computer but they’re still geared towards the former. The Magic W3′s primary function is as a handheld computer that also happens to have telephone functionality. What’s the difference? The Atom-powered W3 runs on a full version of Windows 7 Home Premium for multi-tasking productivity and includes 32GB of onboard solid state storage.

In addition to the Windows 7 OS, the Magic W3 microcomputer runs a Magic Telephony Touch User Interface to cater for user voice and texting needs over a suitable quad-band GSM network. An Intel Atom Z530 processor running at 1.6 GHz provides the computing power, with support from 1GB DDR2 RAM. The 4.8-inch touchscreen display is capable of 720p high definition playback and there’s a 1.3 megapixel webcam for video conferencing or web chat.

The device also benefits from 3G, Bluetooth and 802.11b/g wireless connectivity, and in addition to the obligatory SIM card slot also sports mini-HDMI, mini-USB and microSD. Completing the specs checklist is built-in GPS, accelerometer, dual microphones, stereo speakers and a 3.5mm audio jack.

Having a full version of Windows running on a handheld device may have been enough of an attraction just a few short years ago to make the Magic W3 a huge success, but it’s questionable that it will be able to compete with the many more advanced mobile offerings either already or soon to be available. That said though, there’s nothing wrong with having another choice for mobile computing.

Source: gizmag, W3

SyncML-logo-

Download, Install, and Configure SyncML for Smartphone

This article describes the process of downloading and installing the funambol.com SyncML plugin for the PocketPC.  This will allow the synchronization of calendars, contacts, tasks and notes between a SmarterMail user account and the PocketPC. NOTE: SmarterMail does not support Corporate Calendar because it is a special app and does not follow AS standards. This note only effects the Motorola Droid, Droid 2 and Droid X.

NOTE: Funambol 8.5 is recommended to use due to protocol changes that were made in later version.

  1. Download the SyncML plugin for the PocketPC from the funambol website.
  2. Select Windows Mobile PocketPC
  3. You will be prompted to fill out a registration form or you choose to select “No thanks-please take me straight to the downloads!”
  4. Download the file funambol plugin for pocketpc to the desktop (or a local download folder)
  5. Connect the PocketPC to the Active Sync or Sync Center (Vista)
  6. Install the funambol.com plugin by double clicking on funambol plugin
  7. Once the installation is finished you will see to a configuration screen on the PocketPC
  8. The server location needs be for formatted as:

    http://domainname.com/Sync/Default.aspx

    1. If you are using a port number other than 80 then, the Sever location needs to be formatted:

      http://domainname.com:9998/Sync/Default.aspx

    2. Username need to be: username@domainname.com
    3. Enter password
    4. Save
  9. After Saving select Sync All
  10. A message will appear requesting a full Sync, click Yes to initiate
SyncML-logo-

Install and Configure SyncML for PocketPC

This article describes the process of downloading and installing the Funambol SyncML plugin for the PocketPC. This will allow the synchronization of calendars, contacts, tasks and notes between a SmarterMail user account and the PocketPC. NOTE: SmarterMail does not support Corporate Calendar because it is a special app and does not follow AS standards. This note only effects the Motorola Droid, Droid 2 and Droid X. Funambol 8.5 is recommended to use due to protocol changes that were made in later version.

  1. Download the SyncML plugin for the PocketPC from the funambol website.
  2. Select Windows Mobile PocketPC.
  3. You will be prompted to fill out a registration form or you choose to select “No thanks-please take me straight to the downloads”.
  4. Download the file funambol plugin for pocketpc to the desktop (or a local download folder).
  5. Connect the PocketPC to the Active Sync or Sync Center (Vista).
  6. Install the funambol.com plugin by double clicking on funambol plugin.
  7. Once the installation is finished you will see to a configuration screen on the PocketPC.
  8. The server location needs be for formatted as:

    http://domainname.com/Sync/Default.aspx

    • If you are using a port number other than port 80, then the Sever location needs to be formatted as http://domainname.com:9998/Sync/Default.aspx.
    • Username need to be: username@domainname.com.
    • Enter password.
    • Click Save.
  9. After Saving select Sync All.
  10. A message will appear requesting a full Sync, click Yes to initiate.
SyncML-logo-

Configure SmarterMail Accounts for Synchronization Using SyncML

SmarterMail uses multiple data synchronization technologies to sync mailbox data with email clients and mobile devices. Before users can sync using SyncML, the system administrator must enable synchronization using SyncML for the domain. NOTE: SmarterMail does not support Corporate Calendar because it is a special app and does not follow AS standards. This note only effects the Motorola Droid, Droid 2 and Droid X. Funambol 8.5 is recommended to use due to protocol changes that were made in later version.

Follow these steps to enable SyncML for all of the users on a domain:

  1. Log in as the system administrator.
  2. Click the Manage icon.
  3. Expand Domains in the left tree view and click All Domains.
  4. Select desired domain and click Edit in the actions toolbar.
  5. Click the Features tab.
  6. Select the Enable SyncML checkbox.
  7. Click Save.

SyncML is now enabled for all accounts in the domain. Users will have to install the Funambol SyncML plug-in prior to synchronizing their data with Microsoft Outlook, Mozilla Thunderbird, or most smartphones. For more information on installing this plug-in, refer to the following KB articles:

For more information on SyncML, refer to the Synchronization section of the SmarterMail Online Help.

Motorola DROID Pro

Motorola DROID Pro Review

Motorola DROID Pro. The name just sounds intimidating and serious. The iPhone captured the market byMotorola DROID Pro being fun and approachable, and Google took that a step further with Android by opening up the platform, making it customized and personal. But when you add “pro” to something you’re not messing around, and that’s exactly what Motorola is doing with their latest offering for Verizon Wireless. The Pro aims to take on the BlackBerry segment.

something Android has been garnering attention from anyway, but more specifically the BlackBerry power user, many of which have thus far resisted the lure of the little green robot. From the portrait QWERTY orientation to the lightning fast performance the Motorola DROID Pro is squarely aimed at the suits, but will it be enough to win over this fiercely loyal user base?

Included with the Motorola DROID Pro you will find:

  • Li-Ion battery
  • AC adapter with international adapters
  • USB cable
  • 2GB microSD card

Design

The Motorola DROID Pro may share a form factor with BlackBerry, but it sure doesn’t feel like one. For starters it is narrow and tall, and the screen is very large. BlackBerry devices typically have displays of about 2.4 inches, orientated horizontally, but the DROID Pro features a 3.1” display in portrait orientation. This leaves less room for the keyboard in both dimensions, and as such the keyboard is much more cramped than you would find on a Curve or Bold. Motorola attempts to use the flared key design like we’ve seen with the Bold and Style, but the keys just don’t feel as natural on this device. Because the screen dominates the phone the bottom row of keys ends up at the very bottom of the phone, and this makes using it a bit awkward, similar to what we felt with the sides of the BlackBerry Style. A top-flight BlackBerry keyboard this is not, but that said it is still pretty good. Auto-correct generally fixed the mistakes we made, though in a typical few sentence email we would have to make one or two corrections ourselves, and as with any keyboard we got more used to it the more we used it.

The overall size of the Motorola DROID Pro is good. It has roughly the same footprint as the DROID 2, but is considerably lighter. This is because the device is mainly plastic. Motorola used high quality materials for the Pro, but we would have preferred a soft-touch back instead of the hard plastic they opted for. Nonetheless the DROID Pro feels quite solid in the hand and we don’t have any issues about its build quality.

The 3.1” display is good but not great. It has a resolution of 320×480 and is bright enough to be read in most lighting conditions comfortably. As you might expect it is a multi-touch capacitive touchscreen. It is plenty responsive and offers haptic feedback where appropriate. It surprised us that the screen was not rotating when we turned the phone, but it turns out the auto-rotate feature appears to be turned off by default on the DROID Pro, so a quick trip to the settings menu fixed that.

The Motorola DROID Pro has the standard four Android navigation keys below the screen. They are capacitive and integrated into the display, separate from the keyboard.  On the left side are the volume rocker and microUSB charging port (which glows white while charging) and on the right is a programmable key much like BlackBerry convenience keys. The power button and 3.5mm headphone jack sit atop of the DROID Pro. The stylized back door houses the 5 megapixel camera with dual LED flash at the top left, and the DROID Pro’s single speaker centered near the bottom.

Overall the Motorola DROID Pro offers a good blend of size and functionality in this relatively new form factor for Android. The phone feels good in your hand, and when turned on its side the keypad doesn’t get in the way too much. While that keyboard isn’t as good as what you’d find on the BlackBerry Bold, it is still quite usable and will help the business crowd ease into the transition from their BlackBerry into the DROID Pro.

Source: Phonearena.com