Category Archives: Linux

RedHat Fedora 14 Release On the Way – 26 days left

Red Hat‘s Fedora remains one of the most popular and versatile Linux distributions available today.\r\n

Redhat Fedora 14 on the way to your desktop\r\n\r\nRedhat Fedora 14\r\n\r\n

\r\nRelease details are listed below:\r\n\r\nNew Software Versions\r\n

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  • Linux Kernel 2.6.35 – Newest Linux Kernel
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  • Gnome 2.32 – Newest Gnome Desktop
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  • KDE Plasma Desktop 4.5.0 – Newest KDE Desktop
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  • OpenOffice.org 3.3 – Office suite
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  • NetBeans 6.9 – An open-source integrated development environmen (IDE)
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  • Eclipse Helios 3.6 – An open-source integrated development environmen (IDE)
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  • Python 2.7 – Updated Python to the upstream 2.7 release of Python Programming environment/language
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  • Perl 5.12 – Perl updated to 5.12 version
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  • MeeGo 1.0 – MeeGo Netbook UX 1.0 experience in Fedora
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\r\nFedora 14 Other Improvements, Changes and Features\r\n

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  • Linux Kernel 2.6.35 – Linux 2.6.35 includes a wide range of new features
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  • Desktop Virtualization – Spice is a complete open source solution for interaction with virtualized desktops, focusing on the provision of high-quality remote access to QEMU machines.
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  • Faster JPEG Compression/Decompression – The replacement of libjpeg with libjpeg-turbo brings speed improvements
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  • New and Updated Programming Languages – Fedora 14 sees the introduction of D, a systems programming language combining the power and high performance of C and C++ with the programmer productivity of modern languages like Ruby and Python.
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  • Better Tools For Developers – Netbeans 6.9, Eclipse Helios 3.6, D programming
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  • KDE Plasma Desktop 4.5.0 – KDE 4.5.0 introduces window tiling and better notification features, along with many stability and performance improvements.
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  • Sugar 0.90 – The latest release of Sugar features major usability improvements for the first login screen and the control panel, as well as support for 3G networks.
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  • Improved Netbook Experience With MeeGo – The MeeGo Netbook UX 1.0 provides a user interface tailored specifically for netbooks, building on the foundations laid by Moblin in previous Fedora releases.
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  • IPMI Server Management Made Simple – ipmiutil, an easy-to-use, fully-featured IPMI server management utility that allows a wide range of management functions to be performed with just a few commands.\r\n\r\n
    Fedorea 14 Beta Desktop
    Fedorea 14 Beta Desktop
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Clonezilla – Live & Enterprise

cloneZilla LogoClonezilla is a bootable CD-ROM designed for partition / disk backup and restoration. Unlike SystemRescueCD, Clonezilla Live doesn’t contain an array of utilities, instead, it is a single, focused tool. If you’re interested in simply backing up or restoring whole partitions to or from files, or copying one partition onto another, Clonezilla might be just what you’re looking for.\r\n\r\nThere are two primary uses for a tool such as this one: backup and subsequent restoration in the event of a mishap or creating a clone of an existing system. So, you could install Linux on one machine, backup the entire disk to a file and then copy the setup to other machines. On the other hand, the partition imaging allows you to do a system backup that can restore a complete system, unlike a traditional backup utility that can only restore your files.\r\n\r\nWhen imaging to a file, the resulting file should be smaller than the entire size of the partition because Clonezilla doesn’t back up the free space. It has support for most of the file systems that you are likely to encounter and it can backup those that it doesn’t recognise, although this results in larger files. When restoring a partition, the hard disk drive must be the same size or larger than the source hard drive, but you can copy a smaller hard drive onto a larger one.\r\n\r\nNote that another version of Clonezilla, Clonezilla SE (Server Edition) is designed for restoring partitions to multiple machines via a network for mass cloning. Clonezilla Live, the version that we are discussing here, can restore or backup a single partition over a network or a removable storage device such as a USB stick, or even another local hard drive. A partition image file can’t reside upon a partition that is going to be operated upon.\r\n\r\nNow that we’ve determined what Clonezilla is for, how easy is it to use? The answer is that the procedure is very simple. The start up menu is, as you might expect, mainly orientated towards starting the partition copying utility, although it does feature options for network booting, starting FreeDOS or running Memtest. This means that, if armed with only a Clonezilla Live disc, you might find yourself stuck if you needed to edit some files or even edit the partition table of a disk.\r\n\r\nOnce Clonezilla Live has booted, it presents the user with a text mode, menu driven interface that is used throughout the system. After choosing the keymap and language, one then answers a simple question to determine whether to clone to and from image files or to copy to and from partitions. You select the source and destination partitions from the menu and confirm that you are ready to proceed. After confirmation, Clonezilla churns away for a while, and hey presto, your cloning or imaging operation is complete. It’s as simple as that.\r\n\r\nNaturally, the usual warnings about being careful with a tool like this apply.\r\n\r\nClonezilla is designed for one task, and that orientation brings with it the advantage of simplicity of operation. For this reason, it could form the basis of a regular system backup or cloning set up, even though it doesn’t offer any maintenance features outside of the core functionality. The Clonezilla website.

PostgreSQL 9.0 Final Release Available Now!

PostGreSQL LogoPostGreSQL version 9.0 was released on Sept 20th 2010. The 9.0 version of PostgreSQL includes a number of important new features, more new features in fact than any previous release.\r\n\r\nSome of the new features found in 9.0 are:\r\n

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  • Streaming Replication – This allows one or more databases to be replicated from a primary database. The replication is asychronous but the lag between replications is short. Note that other 3rd party solutions for this have existed for some time.
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  • Hot Standby – This allows a second (duplicate) database to be designated as a standby in case the primary database goes down for some reason. The standby can also be used for read-only queries when the primary database is active, thereby providing a bit of load balancing. HotStandby works well with the new Streaming Replication feature.
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  • In-Place Upgrade – Using the pg_upgrade module databases created with older versions of PostgreSQL can be upgraded in-place without the need to dump and reload the database.
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  • Support for 64-bit Windows – For those of you that are familiar with whatever this “Windows” thing is.
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\r\nBelow is answer to Questions by Robin Schumacher (EnterpriseDB) and Josh Berkus (PostgreSQL community):\r\n\r\nQ: How does PostgreSQL measure up against Oracle as an enterprise database?\r\n\r\nANS (Robin): From an EnterpriseDB perspective, we’re the leaders in providing an Oracle compatibility layer that people can use to run their Oracle applications on Postgres with little to no changes. Companies like IBM and Netezza use our Oracle compatibility layer inside their products to enable the same type of functionality.\r\n\r\nWith our Postgres Plus Advanced Server, we have everything from mirrored Oracle core features, support for Oracle’s PL/SQL language, built in Oracle SQL packages, Oracle data dictionary and performance diagnostic compatibility, and more that lets database professionals use Advanced Server instead of Oracle as their database. We also support replicating data from Oracle to Postgres Plus Advanced Server so users can offload Oracle transactional data for reporting or other purposes on a more cost effective platform.\r\n\r\nANS (Josh): The limited benchmark results we have available, such as the SpecJAppserver benchmark published in 2007, indicate that performance on the two database systems is very similar, and that differences in performance are not enough to prevent migration. Beyond that, each database system has its strengths. Certainly, hundreds of users have migrated applications from Oracle to PostgreSQL successfully, and hundreds more work in a hybrid PostgreSQL-Oracle environment.\r\n\r\nPostgreSQL 9.0 is superior for:\r\n

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  • Integration with 3rd-party open source tools
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  • Ability to extend functionality for specialized needs (such as biotech, security, or marketing analytics)
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  • Virtualized (cloud) deployments
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\r\nOracle 11 is superior for:\r\n

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  • Compatibility with existing proprietary vendor tools
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  • OLAP business intelligence
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  • Monitoring and administration tools
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\r\nThe last point is one which the PostgreSQL community is working actively on; each recent annual release has added several new or easier-to-use tools for monitoring and administration. Your primary reader audience will be particularly interested in the tools designed to integrate with Linux, such as pgTop (now available for Android as well) and pgFincore\r\n\r\nMore information on PostgreSQL 9.0:\r\n

\r\nDownload 9.0 now:\r\n