Tag Archives: Smartphone

Silverlight for S60 5th edition is available along with a Bing App

 \r\n\r\nSilverlight for smartphone\r\n\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nSilverlight, the cross-browser, cross-platform implementation of the .NET Framework for building media experiences and rich interactive applications for the Web on desktop computers, is available for Nokia S60 5th Edition smartphones such as Nokia 5800 XpressMusic, Nokia N97 and Nokia N97 Mini.\r\n\r\nThe release of Silverlight comes the Bing Application.\r\nThe owners for s60 smart phones will be able to view Silverlight content right from your Nokia S60 browser, which is a big plus. Other than that and the new Bing application, currently I don’t see other uses for Silverlight on my Nokia N97, but this might be just for now.\r\n\r\nGet Silverlight for S60 5th edition here!\r\nGet the Bing Application for S60 5th edition here!\r\n\r\n\r\nSilverlight for s60 smartphone\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\nNote: All logos, images and trademarks used in articles on this site are property of its respective owners.

First Look: Nokia Astound Smartphone

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Nokia Astound Smartphone\r\n

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Mobile handset maker Nokia Corp. launched smartphone Nokia Astound, available exclusively from T-Mobile USA, the unit of Germany’s Deutsche Telekom AG (DTEGY.PK: News ), since April 6. The Astound has a sleek stainless-steel design that features an 8-megapixel camera with dual-LED flash and 720p HD video capture, a 3.5-inch capacitive touch AMOLED display, free turn-by-turn navigation from Nokia and access to thousands of free and paid apps via Nokia’s Ovi Store.\r\n

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With the latest commercial version of Ovi Maps, the Astound provides free voice-guided, turn-by-turn navigation in almost 100 countries in 46 languages. Additional countries and languages are available to download free from Nokia.\r\n

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Mark Slater, vice president of sales, Nokia, stated, “As millions more consumers make the switch to smartphones, Nokia is proud to offer an alternative that is not only easy and fun to use, but is also very sexy and sleek, unlike anything in its price point.”\r\n

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The phone itself is quite attractive with a white and silver color scheme and slim profile. While the Astound might be attractive on the outside, Symbian is still, well, Symbian. Although it is a powerful and full-featured platform, its whole aesthetic feels dated and static compared to Android 2.3, Apple’s iOS, and even the latest version of RIM’s BlackBerry OS. Thankfully, this is the most recent version of Symbian S^3 so you get a portrait QWERTY keyboard and a browser improved from the previous versions.\r\n

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Nokia officials had no comment on its relationship with Microsoft, but they did hint that there will be more Symbian phones to come. The Astound is available online as well as at T-Mobile stores.

Nokia unveils 2 smartphones, Symbian refresh

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Nokia, the world’s largest phone maker by volume, unveiled on Tuesday two new smartphone models running on a new version of its Symbian software platform. The new models, the E6 and the X7, will go on sale for 340 euros ($491.6) and 380 euros respectively excluding subsidies and taxes, later this quarter. In February, Nokia’s new chief executive Stephen Elop dumped Symbian software — which lost most of its lead on the smartphone market last year — saying the company would instead use Microsoft Corp’s unproven software as its primary platform.\r\n

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Elop compared Symbian to a burning platform in a widely leaked internal memo, saying it was not good enough for Nokia’s future. On Tuesday Nokia unveiled a new version of Symbian software, with new icons, improved text input, faster Internet browsing and a refreshed Ovi Maps application.\r\n

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“Several Nokia executives have attempted to walk back from Elop’s February comments and limit the damage he did to Symbian products,” said Tero Kuittinen, analyst at MKM Partners.\r\n

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“It’s just a bit too late to put Humpty Dumpty back together. Developers are bailing out in droves,” he said.\r\n

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Source: Reuters\r\n

Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660 Review

Samsung has announced its brand new mid-range Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660 Android Powered Smartphone, just in time for official unveiling of the same at forthcoming Mobile World Congress 2011, that is powered by Qualcomm QCT MSM7227-1 Turbo 800 MHz processor and runs Android 2.2 Froyo.\r\n\r\n

Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660
Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660
\r\n\r\nThe Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660 smartphone is Quad-band GSM: 850, 900, 1800, 1900 dual-band 3G HSDPA: 900, 2100 ready device which is powered by 800 MHz Qualcomm QCT MSM7227-1 Turbo Processor and features 158MB RAM with microSD card supporting 32GB expandable memory allowing practically unlimited entries contact phonebook and SMS memory.\r\n\r\nSamsung Galaxy Gio S5660 smartphone features 3.2-inch, HVGA 320 x 480 pixel TFT capacitive touchscreen supporting 16 million colors and sports two touch-sensitive keys and a large home key in same fashion as on Galaxy S series smartphones.The smartphone also includes Accelerometer sensor for auto screen rotate and runs on Android 2.2 Froyo version with Samsung’s TouchWiz v3.0 user interface over Android just like the one in Samsung Galaxy series smartphones.\r\n\r\nThe new Samsung Galaxy Gio S5660 offers exhaustive data connectivity that includes GPRS, EDGE, 3G HSDPA 7.2 Mbps download speed, Wi-Fi 802.11b/g/N Wireless LAN with DLNA, Bluetooth 2.1+EDR with A2DP wireless connection, GPS with Assisted GPS (A-GPS) and microUSB 2.0 for wired connectivity.\r\n\r\nSamsung Galaxy Gio S5660 includes 3.15 megapixel (2048 x 1536 pixel) rear auto-focus camera ( no LED flash) with added geo-tagging, face and smile recognition capability along with video recording in QVGA resolution. The device does not sports any front-facing camera for video calling.\r\n\r\nSource: MPhone, W3

The iPad 2: What is known, what is unknown Read more about next-generation iPad by ssysadmin.com

We’re just 48 hours away from getting our first look at the long-awaited, next-generation iPad—or that’s what we’re expecting, at least.\r\n\r\n

iPad 2
iPad 2
\r\n\r\nIndeed, with all the leaks, rumors, and wild guesses we’ve been hearing in the past months about the next iPad, it’s easy to forget that Apple hasn’t even officially announced the thing yet, much less doled out any details or pictures.\r\n\r\nSince we still have a couple days to kill before Apple ends the suspense, now might a good time to summarize what we know, what we think we know, and—most importantly—what we definitely don’t know about the iPad 2.\r\n\r\nWhat we know\r\n\r\nThe original iPad is still the only iPad, for now: Like I just said, Apple has yet to announce, acknowledge, make veiled references to, or even hint at a new iPad. Well … strike that: during Apple’s most recent quarterly earnings call, Apple COO Tim Cook told analysts (who’d been asking about competition from impending Android-based tablets) that “we’re not sitting still” in terms of the tablet market, a remark that may qualify as a vague hint.\r\n\r\nApple is holding an iPad-related event Wednesday: The invitations went out last week, with an image showing a Mac OS calendar page peeled back to reveal an iPad peeking out from behind. The caption: “Come see what 2011 will be the year of.” So yes—the writing’s on the wall, but the invite stops short of saying “come meet the iPad 2″ or anything like that.\r\n\r\nLast but not least, we know that … uh … : If we’re only talking about things we definitely know about the next iPad … well, strictly speaking, we don’t know much more than what I just outlined above. Oh, wait: Wednesday’s Apple event will be held in San Francisco, at 10 in the morning local time. And iPad-related topics are on the agenda. There you go.\r\n\r\nWhat we don’t know\r\n\r\nWhat it’ll be called: Everyone’s been calling the next iPad the “iPad 2,” and there’s even a new (and likely fan-generated) rendering of the next-generation tablet floating around with the “iPad 2″ name stamped on the back. But as far as I know, no one’s come out and reported that the iPad 2 will, in fact, be called the iPad 2. Apple’s been known to throw curve balls when it comes to naming its next-gen products (like, for example, the iPhone 3G and 3GS), so I wouldn’t put all my eggs in the “iPad 2″ basket.\r\n\r\nHow much internal storage it’ll have: Will we get an iPad 2 model with 128GB of built-in flash storage, or will the largest next-gen iPad still top out at 64GB? Hard to say. There have been scattered reports of iPad 2 mockups with “128GB” etched onto the back, but that may be more a case of wishful thinking than a concrete clue. I predict the priciest iPad will still offer “just” 64GB of flash storage (which still costs a premium compared to conventional disc-based hard drives), but that’s only a guess on my part.\r\n\r\nHow much it will cost: Apple is in the habit of marking its next-generation products with the same price as the previous generation, and there’s no reason to believe that Cupertino will change course with the iPad 2. Again, though, we’ve yet to hear any reliable rumors about pricing. (For the record, the current iPad costs anywhere from $499 for the 16GB Wi-Fi-only version to $829 for the 64GB 3G iPad.)\r\n\r\nWhen it will ship: Conventional wisdom initially had it that the new iPad would probably hit stores about a month or so after being announced, but now there’s talk the iPad 2 might be available immediately. Maybe so, but personally, I’m hedging my bets until Apple serves up the official line.\r\n\r\nWhat we think we know\r\n\r\nSlimmer profile, less heft: Just about everyone seems to agree that the redesigned iPad will be “smaller” and “lighter” than its predecessor, complete with a flatter back and tapered edges. Indeed, chatter about a slimmed-down iPad 2 shell has been so consistent (not to mention a logical progression for the iPad line) that I’d be shocked if it didn’t come to pass Wednesday.\r\n\r\nA camera, or two: Another consistent iPad 2 rumor has it that Apple will fix one of the biggest criticisms of the original iPad—namely, the lack of a camera. A recent Wall Street Journal story claimed that the new iPad will have “at least” one camera in front for FaceTime video chat, and there have been countless sightings of purported iPad 2 cases with strategically placed holes in back for a second, rear-facing lens. While there still seems to be some lingering doubt about a second camera, a front-facing lens is pretty much a no-brainer, particularly since each and every iPad competitor out there has one.\r\n\r\nSame-resolution display: The hot rumor back in December had it that the iPad 2 would arrive with a sharper, 2,048-by-1,536 pixel display, good for a “retina”-style screen similar to the one on the iPhone 4. But the latest word and some leaked spy shots have poured cold water on the buzz, and it’s now looking almost certain that the revamped iPad display will come with a 1,024-by-768-resolution display, same as the original. Oh well. (Don’t worry; recent chatter has it that the iPad 3—yes, 3—might get the retina-display treatment.)\r\n\r\nFaster, beefier processor: “Dual-core” is the gotta-have spec when it comes to this year’s hottest smartphones and gadgets, and the iPad 2 is no exception. Most believe the revamped tablet will get an updated, dual-core version of Apple’s A4 “system-on-a-chip,” complete with 512MB of RAM (double the 256MB RAM in the original iPad) and some seriously souped-up graphics capabilities.\r\n\r\nBetter speaker: The new iPad is reportedly in line for an improved, “wide-ranged” speaker, with the more prominent speaker grille said to be sitting right where the current three-hole speaker on the first iPad lives. Or so they say.\r\n\r\nNo SD card: An SD (or microSD) card slot on the next iPad would allow for easy memory expansion and speedy photo uploading. It’s a nice idea, but early buzz on Apple adding an SD card slot to the iPad has given way to near-universal agreement that it won’t actually happen. Bummer.\r\n\r\nNo 4G support: Not on Verizon Wireless, at least, according to the Wall Street Journal, which adds that the 3G version of the iPad 2 will be available through AT&T and Verizon but not Sprint or T-Mobile.\r\n\r\nSource: yahoonews, W3

Magic W3: Mini-PC with phone capabilities

Magic W3, Mini PC with phone capabilities
Magic W3, Mini PC with phone capabilities
\r\n\r\nRecently, devices like LG’s Tegra 2-powered Optimus 2X have blurred the lines between smartphone and mini-computer but they’re still geared towards the former. The Magic W3’s primary function is as a handheld computer that also happens to have telephone functionality. What’s the difference? The Atom-powered W3 runs on a full version of Windows 7 Home Premium for multi-tasking productivity and includes 32GB of onboard solid state storage.\r\n\r\nIn addition to the Windows 7 OS, the Magic W3 microcomputer runs a Magic Telephony Touch User Interface to cater for user voice and texting needs over a suitable quad-band GSM network. An Intel Atom Z530 processor running at 1.6 GHz provides the computing power, with support from 1GB DDR2 RAM. The 4.8-inch touchscreen display is capable of 720p high definition playback and there’s a 1.3 megapixel webcam for video conferencing or web chat.\r\n\r\nThe device also benefits from 3G, Bluetooth and 802.11b/g wireless connectivity, and in addition to the obligatory SIM card slot also sports mini-HDMI, mini-USB and microSD. Completing the specs checklist is built-in GPS, accelerometer, dual microphones, stereo speakers and a 3.5mm audio jack.\r\n\r\nHaving a full version of Windows running on a handheld device may have been enough of an attraction just a few short years ago to make the Magic W3 a huge success, but it’s questionable that it will be able to compete with the many more advanced mobile offerings either already or soon to be available. That said though, there’s nothing wrong with having another choice for mobile computing.\r\n\r\nSource: gizmag, W3