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Configure SmarterMail Accounts for Synchronization Using SyncML

SmarterMail uses multiple data synchronization technologies to sync mailbox data with email clients and mobile devices. Before users can sync using SyncML, the system administrator must enable synchronization using SyncML for the domain. NOTE: SmarterMail does not support Corporate Calendar because it is a special app and does not follow AS standards. This note only effects the Motorola Droid, Droid 2 and Droid X. Funambol 8.5 is recommended to use due to protocol changes that were made in later version.\r\n\r\nFollow these steps to enable SyncML for all of the users on a domain:\r\n

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  1. Log in as the system administrator.
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  3. Click the Manage icon.
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  5. Expand Domains in the left tree view and click All Domains.
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  7. Select desired domain and click Edit in the actions toolbar.
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  9. Click the Features tab.
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  11. Select the Enable SyncML checkbox.
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  13. Click Save.
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\r\nSyncML is now enabled for all accounts in the domain. Users will have to install the Funambol SyncML plug-in prior to synchronizing their data with Microsoft Outlook, Mozilla Thunderbird, or most smartphones. For more information on installing this plug-in, refer to the following KB articles:\r\n

\r\nFor more information on SyncML, refer to the Synchronization section of the SmarterMail Online Help.

AntiVirus Software Review Product Comparisons

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Antivirus Software review

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Why Buy Antivirus Software?

\r\nToday, an unprotected computer isn’t just vulnerable, it’s probably already infected. New viruses, spyware, trojans, worms, and other malware are created every day. New threats are disguised to bypass other security measures, and specifically designed to catch you and your PC off guard.\r\n\r\nThe virus landscape has also changed; viruses that used to be annoying pranks have evolved into pernicious threats capable of not only destroying your computer, but stealing your information and identity.\r\n\r\nThe benefits of installing a basic security solution on your PC are obvious, but the cost in system slowdown used to make it tough to bear. Luckily, modern antivirus software haven’t just improved their level of protection, they’ve significantly improved resource efficiency and overall speed. You can have ultimate protection without giving up your resources. With advanced technologies and straightforward usability, antivirus software is more effective than ever, and doesn’t require constant maintenance from you. Say goodbye to annoying security warnings and noticeable slowdown; current antivirus programs deliver constant protection and can actually speed up your computer.\r\n\r\nThe last generation of antivirus software brought advanced heuristic detection into the mix. Continuing to improve, the 2011 lineup of antivirus products often incorporate further developed proactive protection with better behavior checking and even file reputation analysis. Several of the software incorporate ‘in the cloud’ security and other advanced technologies to increase safety and convenience. From gamer modes, to battery saving settings, to integrated web link scanners; antivirus applications are more versatile and have upped the ante for features and functionality.\r\n\r\nOn antivirus software review site you’ll find a side-by-side comparison of the best antivirus software, helpful articles on computer security, security tips and tricks, buying guides, videos, and comprehensive reviews to help you make an informed decision on which security software is right for you.\r\n

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What to Look For in Antivirus Software

\r\nAll security software is not created equal. Like all consumer products, antivirus software has the good, the bad, and the mediocre. The choices for antivirus protection are many and varied. Although we haven’t reviewed each and every product available, we feature the absolute best antivirus software available today from a number of providers (including big-hitters, lesser-knowns, and new-comers), and compare them so you can match your needs with the right software.\r\n\r\nRemember when it really comes down to it, effectiveness and usability can either make or break antivirus software. Security programs are only as good as their level of protection, and if you can’t figure out how to use it, you won’t. Our top-ranked antivirus software combine optimal security with user-friendly features and tools.\r\n\r\nBelow are the criteria TopTenREVIEWS uses to evaluate and compare antivirus software:\r\n\r\nScope of Protection\r\nWhile most security solutions tout “multi-layered” protection, “360 degree” defense and/or even “100%” security, some are certainly more thorough than others. The best antivirus solutions will include traditional protection from viruses, worms, Trojans and spyware, but should also include defense from keyloggers, phishing scams, email-borne threats and rootkits. While antivirus programs are by no means full-blown internet security suites, they should protect from as many threats on as many fronts as they can.\r\n\r\nEffectiveness\r\nAntivirus is specifically designed to protect your computer, so if it doesn’t do that well, what good is it? All the features, bells and whistles, or sleek interface can’t make up for poor performance. We look at results from the industry-standard security software testers and professional security organizations to find the most effective software available and evaluate overall effectiveness. In general, our highest ranked programs are also the most effective.\r\n\r\nEase of Installation and Setup\r\nSecurity software shouldn’t be a chore to install, and should have you protected as soon as possible. From download to install, to the first scan; implementing antivirus software should be quick and easy.\r\n\r\nEase of Use\r\nAntivirus software is complex stuff, but shouldn’t require a degree in computer security. The best security programs have all the features security experts want, but are just as easily used by a beginner. Everyday computer users want a security solution that they can install and forget about; software that doesn’t require constant maintenance or have annoying interruptions. The best antivirus software is flexible enough to do exactly what you want to (even if that means running by itself).\r\n\r\nFeatures\r\nA well-rounded feature set takes a security solution from good to great. More than bells and whistles, added features provide security, usability and performance benefits.\r\n\r\nUpdates\r\nSecurity software is only as good as its latest update. Viruses are being identified and added to signature databases all the time, so it’s important that your virus definition list updates accordingly. Modern antivirus software are equipped with automatic updates that perform regularly enough that you get faster updates that don’t slow down your system. The best security providers even “push” updates to you as soon as they’re available.\r\n\r\nHelp & Support\r\nThe best software doesn’t require reading an in-depth manual to use, but still has one available. For specific questions, troubleshooting, and additional help, the best antivirus manufacturers provide superior product support online and off. Additional support for software may come in the form of assistance over the phone, email, live chat, or through a number of additional resources (knowledgebase, FAQs, tutorials).\r\n\r\nA well-balanced antivirus solution is effective, efficient, and easy to use. Combining all the right features with a usable interface; our top antivirus software choices deliver the best security and usability without a serious investment in time, money, or system resources.

Worm or Virus – What is the Difference?

\r\n\r\nEveryone has been infected with a virus at one time or another either through the common cold or the flu. A virus attacks the human body by entering through one of the many openings and attaching itself to a host cell. It releases a piece of genetic information into the cell and recruits the cell’s enzymes to propagate the genetic information. Once the genetic code has been adequately replicated, it destroys the cell and attacks cells nearby.\r\n\r\nHow does a computer virus simulate a biological virus? Just as a biological virus injects its own genetic information into a cell and interferes with the body’s normal operations, a computer virus is a program written to interfere with the proper functioning of a computer. It may damage programs, delete files, reformat hard disks and perform other forms of destructive acts.\r\n\r\nTo be classified as a virus, a program must meet two criteria. It must be able to execute itself by placing its own code in the execution path of another program. The program must also be able to replicate itself by replacing existing computer files with copies of the virus-infected files. Similar to the way a biological virus requires a host cell, a computer virus requires an infected host file to propagate itself.\r\n\r\nViruses have become the villains of the computer world, propagating themselves and destroying everything in their path. However, another tool of destruction, known as the worm, has been creeping into the computer industry. Most of us have heard of the dreaded Blaster worm that attacks Microsoft websites, but what exactly is a worm and how does it differ from a virus? Actually, a worm is a type of virus that attacks the computer in a method differing from the way a typical virus attacks a computer. Unlike the typical virus, the worm does not require a host program to propagate. A worm enters a computer through a weakness in the computer system and propagates itself using network flaws.\r\n\r\nThe typical virus requires activation through user intervention, such as double clicking or sending outgoing email. However, a worm releases a document containing the “worm” macro and sends copies of itself to other computers through network flaws, therefore bypassing any need for user intervention.\r\n\r\nSo, what can you do to protect your computer from virus infection? There are a number of preventative measures that you can take. For example, you can purchase and continually update virus scan software. Make sure that this software contains the “real-time” scanning feature which monitors all incoming and outgoing mail. You may also install a firewall which prohibits unauthorized access to your computer. By installing these preventative devices, you can proactively defend against viruses.\r\n

References:

\r\nAOL.com: What’s the Difference Between Viruses, Worms, and Trojans? (2005).\r\n\r\n Phoenix. CastleCops.biz: What is the Difference Between Viruses, Worms, and Trojans? (2003.)\r\n\r\nSullivan, Rob. SearchEnginePosition.com: The Difference Between Viruses and Worms. SEP. (2004)\r\n\r\nSymantec.com: What is the Difference Between Viruses, Worms, and Trojans? Symantec Corporation. (2005).

Top Rogue Scanners to Avoid

Fake Antivirus scanners, or Rogue scanners come in many forms. Many alter the properties of your browser window to make it look like a legitimate program, when in reality, it’s just a browser window. Others, executed via active-x, script or injected via a Virus, will actually look like a running program. These programs have a single goal, and that is to trick the user into actually installing the program. Once installed, the effects range from annoying to devastating. These programs will produce false alerts telling the user that there is a virus, pornography, and other items on their computer. It then has a fix it button. Once pushed, they are directed to pay a certain amount of money for a solution that never happens.\r\n\r\nSome of these rogue programs are unusually deceiving. Programs like Antivirus 360, use the name 360 because the targeted user may believe that it is directly related to Norton 360. Others use names that lead people to believe that they are legitimate. They even go as far as using an exact replica of Microsoft’s Security center, producing an image like the one below.\r\n

\r\nNotice under “Virus Protection” there is a listing for one of the most common Rogue programs. Here, they want you to click on those buttons, ultimately obtaining your credit card and money from you, with no actual solution to your problem.\r\nHere is a list we have compiled of the Top Ten Rogue Antispyware programs to watch out for, and a description of each one and their tactics. There is actually a very long list, but here are the most commonly seen rogue programs in our experience.\r\n

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  1. Antispyware XP 2009 – Uses a replica of the Microsoft Security Center, as pictured above. Antivirus 2009 comes in many names, including Antivirus 2008, Antivirus XP/Vista and Antivirus XP 2009, XP Antispyware 2009
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  3. Antivirus 360
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  5. WinCleaner 2009
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  7. Malware Doctor
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  9. Spyware XP Guard
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  11. Spyware Remover 2009
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  13. Total Protect 2009/Total Defender/Total Security
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  15. Virus Shield 2009/Virus Shield Pro
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  17. Windows Security Suite
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  19. WinAntivirus XP/Vista
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\r\nShould you come across one of these programs on your system, we highly recommend that you get it removed as quickly as possible. It has been our experience that the longer they stay on the computer, the worse the damage gets.\r\n\r\nBy: Josh Borglund, Toptenreviews

VirtualBox 4.0.0 Beta 1 released for testing

Oracle has released a first beta for version 4.0.0 of the open source VirtualBox desktop virtualisation application for x86 hardware. According to Oracle’s Frank Mehnert, the preview of the next major update to VirtualBox is considered to be a “bleeding-edge release meant for early evaluation and testing purposes”. \r\n\r\nVirtualBox 4.0.0 Beta 1 features new settings and a disk file layout for VM portability, support for the Open Virtualisation Format Archive (OVA) and a redesigned user interface with guest window preview and a new display mode. Support for asynchronous I/O for iSCSI, VMDK, VHD and Parallels images, as well as resizing VDI and VHD images has also been added. Other changes include support for more than 1.5/2 GB guest RAM on 32-bit hosts, the ability to copy files into a guest file system, support for the Intel ICH9 chip-set and a number of bug fixes.\r\n\r\nAs with all development releases, use in production environments and on mission critical systems is not advised. The developers ask users testing the release not to report issues to the VirtualBox Bugtracker, but instead to provide feedback about any problems they encounter via the VirtualBox forum.\r\n\r\nMore details about the development preview, including a full list of changes and new features, can be found in the official release announcement. VirtualBox 4.0.0 Beta 1 is available to download from the project’s site. The latest stable release of VM VirtualBox is version 3.2.12 from the end of November.\r\n\r\nUpdate: Starting with version 4.0 the license for VirtualBox has changed. For the first time, both the base Oracle VM VirtualBox product source code and the binary are licensed under the GPLv2, while the Extension Pack mechanism, which allows third-party sources to add their own add-on functionality, is licensed under the PUEL. The change means that distributors shipping the Open Source Edition (OSE) of VirtualBox no longer need to build from the sources themselves.\r\n\r\nSource: HOpen, Oracle

Is Google eBookstore bigger best?

I love to read, I pretty much read everything I get my hands on, including my morning cereal box. Google EBook\r\n\r\nI have books on my iPod Touch, my iPad, my laptop and my phone, believe it or not, I think I’d still also enjoy having an eReader. I know I’m probably not the norm, but there are probably a few people out there just like me.\r\n\r\nEnough folks like me, that the new Google eBookstore might just be a good thing. Touting themselves as having the largest digital bookstore in the world,\r\n\r\nthe Google eBookstore is a bit different in a few ways. First, unlike Amazon, Google sells books that come in various formats and can be read on almost any device, from the iPad to your netbook or smartphone… but uh-oh, not on your Kindle.\r\n\r\nSecond, The Google eBookstore might just be bigger than it’s competitors, with over 3 million books available with many of them free and hundreds of thousands of titles for sale. The options are certainly extensive. Cheaper? Maybe not, but it certainly seems like a generous selection.\r\n\r\nLastly, Google also offers a Google eBooks Web Reader, where you can buy, store and read Google eBooks in the cloud allowing you access to your ebooks like you would your messages in Gmail, using a free account with unlimited ebooks storage.\r\n\r\nNot everybody needs all this, but I believe its better to have and not need, you know what I mean? But if you have a Kindle, then never mind.\r\n\r\nThe Google eBookstore is open now, at  www.books.google.com\r\n\r\nSource: Google eBooks

Motorola DROID Pro Review

Motorola DROID Pro. The name just sounds intimidating and serious. The iPhone captured the market byMotorola DROID Pro being fun and approachable, and Google took that a step further with Android by opening up the platform, making it customized and personal. But when you add “pro” to something you’re not messing around, and that’s exactly what Motorola is doing with their latest offering for Verizon Wireless. The Pro aims to take on the BlackBerry segment.\r\n\r\nsomething Android has been garnering attention from anyway, but more specifically the BlackBerry power user, many of which have thus far resisted the lure of the little green robot. From the portrait QWERTY orientation to the lightning fast performance the Motorola DROID Pro is squarely aimed at the suits, but will it be enough to win over this fiercely loyal user base?\r\n\r\nIncluded with the Motorola DROID Pro you will find:\r\n

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  • Li-Ion battery
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  • AC adapter with international adapters
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  • USB cable
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  • 2GB microSD card
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\r\nDesign\r\n\r\nThe Motorola DROID Pro may share a form factor with BlackBerry, but it sure doesn’t feel like one. For starters it is narrow and tall, and the screen is very large. BlackBerry devices typically have displays of about 2.4 inches, orientated horizontally, but the DROID Pro features a 3.1” display in portrait orientation. This leaves less room for the keyboard in both dimensions, and as such the keyboard is much more cramped than you would find on a Curve or Bold. Motorola attempts to use the flared key design like we’ve seen with the Bold and Style, but the keys just don’t feel as natural on this device. Because the screen dominates the phone the bottom row of keys ends up at the very bottom of the phone, and this makes using it a bit awkward, similar to what we felt with the sides of the BlackBerry Style. A top-flight BlackBerry keyboard this is not, but that said it is still pretty good. Auto-correct generally fixed the mistakes we made, though in a typical few sentence email we would have to make one or two corrections ourselves, and as with any keyboard we got more used to it the more we used it.\r\n\r\nThe overall size of the Motorola DROID Pro is good. It has roughly the same footprint as the DROID 2, but is considerably lighter. This is because the device is mainly plastic. Motorola used high quality materials for the Pro, but we would have preferred a soft-touch back instead of the hard plastic they opted for. Nonetheless the DROID Pro feels quite solid in the hand and we don’t have any issues about its build quality.\r\n\r\nThe 3.1” display is good but not great. It has a resolution of 320×480 and is bright enough to be read in most lighting conditions comfortably. As you might expect it is a multi-touch capacitive touchscreen. It is plenty responsive and offers haptic feedback where appropriate. It surprised us that the screen was not rotating when we turned the phone, but it turns out the auto-rotate feature appears to be turned off by default on the DROID Pro, so a quick trip to the settings menu fixed that.\r\n\r\nThe Motorola DROID Pro has the standard four Android navigation keys below the screen. They are capacitive and integrated into the display, separate from the keyboard.  On the left side are the volume rocker and microUSB charging port (which glows white while charging) and on the right is a programmable key much like BlackBerry convenience keys. The power button and 3.5mm headphone jack sit atop of the DROID Pro. The stylized back door houses the 5 megapixel camera with dual LED flash at the top left, and the DROID Pro’s single speaker centered near the bottom.\r\n\r\nOverall the Motorola DROID Pro offers a good blend of size and functionality in this relatively new form factor for Android. The phone feels good in your hand, and when turned on its side the keypad doesn’t get in the way too much. While that keyboard isn’t as good as what you’d find on the BlackBerry Bold, it is still quite usable and will help the business crowd ease into the transition from their BlackBerry into the DROID Pro.\r\n\r\nSource: Phonearena.com

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